BAME COMMUNITY HEALTH

Fighting Against Health Inequalities

We care passionately about promoting diversity, social integration, equality and inclusion within the healthcare services. Part of doing this is to fight institutionalised racism and discrimination whilst tackling the wider issues of poverty, racism and discrimination which are often at the root causes of health inequalities.One of core elements of our work is to foster greater health and wellbeing across society as a whole through enabling those of a BAME backgrounds to access relevant health services. We also promote awareness and challenge policies.

The report also found that:

We undertake steps to:

  • Address health inequality: We work within communities and with healthcare providers to raise awareness of health and wellbeing issues and their connection to those of a BAME background.
  • Improve access: We work with individuals and communities to increase access to health services, including screening services and preventative measures. This includes signposting and giving advice.
  • Provide training: We provide both advice and training to enable those within the BAME community to understand health and wellbeing and the options open to them.
  • Provide information: We recognise that accessing healthcare requires us to provide independent and confidential information and advice regarding a range of things including welfare rights and benefits, equality and human rights, housing, employment and legal issues.

According to Equality and Health Inequalities Pack from NHS England, people living in deprived areas on average have poorer health and shorter lives. Research shows that socioeconomic inequalities result in increased morbidity and decreased life expectancy. The UCL Institute of Health Equity estimates 1.3 to 2.5 million potential years of life lost annually due to inequalities.

The report also found that:

The report also found that:

  • Black African women had a mortality rate four times higher than White women in the UK
  • There is a significant disproportionate number of ethnic minorities detained under mental health legislation in hospitals in England and Wales
  • Black African women were seven times more likely to be detained than White British women
  • Gypsies, Travellers and Roma were found to suffer poorer mental health than the rest of the population in Britain and they were also more likely to suffer from anxiety and depression

Further examples of health inequalities include…

  • African-Caribbean and Asian females over 65 have a higher risk of cervical cancer
  • South Asians are up to 6 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes
  • Muslim people report worse health on average compared to other religious groups

Our aims

Our aims with our health and wellbeing programme centre on promotion of awareness as well as opening access to health services.

We aim to tackle health inequalities and how they predominantly affects BAME individuals through also addressing the relevant socioeconomic determinants fuelling it.

Our Services

A core element of our work is to foster greater health and wellbeing across society as a whole through enabling those of a BAME background to access relevant services.

 

Our Services

We undertake steps to:

  • Address health inequality: We work within communities and with healthcare providers to raise awareness of health and wellbeing issues and their connection to those of a BAME background.
  • Improve access: We work with individuals and communities to increase access to health services, including screening services and preventative measures. This includes signposting and giving advice.
  • Provide training: We provide both advice and training to enable those within the BAME community to understand health and wellbeing and the options open to them. We offer training within the community.
  • Provide information: We recognise that accessing healthcare requires us to provide independent and confidential information and advice regarding a range of things including welfare rights and benefits, equality and human rights, housing, employment and legal issues.

We care passionately about promoting diversity, social integration, equality and inclusion within the health sector Part of doing this is to fight institutionalised racism and discrimination whilst tackling the wider issues of poverty which are often at the root of health problems.

Expected Outcomes

It’s time for change when it comes to the health and wellbeing of those in BAME groups. We are working with communities to see real change:

  • Health not inequality: Our overriding success will be when those in BAME communities are living longer and healthier, on a par with the rest of wider society.
  • Choices not restrictions: We hope to see individuals empowered to take steps to improve their own health and wellbeing, drawing on our advice, training and support.
  • Awareness not lack of knowledge: Individuals will become more informed about health services and how they can access them.
  • Equality not risk: Reductions in the socioeconomic disparity between social groups so that health outcomes are not determined by racial factors.